Digital Marketing

My Independent Bookshop: a new chapter in book recommendation

‘How many times in the last 10 years have you heard people moan that there is simply too much stuff around for them to read/listen to/watch?’ Read more »

Talking the talk

Anyone who has met her will know that Simon & Schuster's US chief executive Carolyn Reidy is not shy of speaking her mind. I interviewed her at Frankfurt some years ago and found myself wondering whether I should run ALL of the quotes she gave me. Read more »

Paperback pioneers

Commenting on the announcement of Lynda La Plante’s new company, my colleague Philip Jones noted in his recent FutureBook blog that “format shift doesn’t always work as you’d imagine.” How true, as we seem to discover afresh each day. Read more »

Achieving all the sales in the world | @Tom_Chalmers

Earlier in the year, I listened to a panel of major publisher CEOs point to their company’s attempts to grow sales, mainly digital, in new territories.  When discussing rights licensing with publishers, certain areas of the world are often named as a focus – looking to break into China, highlighting Eastern Europe, currently very interested in Latin America, and so on. Read more »

Self-publishing changed my life, but my publisher grew my sales

Two and a half years ago, according to more than one national newspaper, I was the 'Kindle King'. Brilliant, yes? Except two of them also called me a "she", which gives you an indication of how deep their research goes. Read more »

Why Huge Publishing Advances can be Huge Steps Backwards

The reality of a six figure advance is highlighted this week by the failure of Harper Collins to realise its investment in Kindle best-selling sensations Mark Edwards and Louise Voss. A lot of noise was made in 2011 as the Harper Collins joined in a desperate scrap to secure the writing talents of the duo. Sadly and not surprisingly the transition from Kindle sensations to mainstream authors did not work for either Harper Collins or Edwards and Voss.

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Adaptive, Attractive, Interactive: A New Chapter for Digital Textbooks

It sometimes seems that not a day goes by without another article on the death of the textbook. This is perhaps with good reason; the classroom of the future is one that’s connected, collaborative, and built around tablets and digital devices. That’s if it even exists physically; many point to MOOCs and virtualized learning environments as the way forward. Either way, the isolating world of the print textbook seems to be one that will soon be consigned to the dustbin.   Read more »

The fall of the house of books

Format shift doesn't always work as you'd imagine. It is an interesting quirk of publishing history that when paperbacks began to drive the market in the 1970s and 80s, they were often published by specialist publishers unrelated to the publisher of the hardback edition. These paperback publishers licensed the rights off the hardback publisher--and only over time did these publishers get consumed into the bigger houses, and authors accept the inevitable verticalization of their output, whereby their primary publisher became their only publisher across all formats. Read more »

Fifty Shades of Innovation

Fifty Shades of Innovation

Publishers need to stop flirting with innovation and tie the knot if they’re to avoid inevitable demise.  So says Elvin Turner, an innovation consultant to brands in disruptive industries.

“No-one has a clue what to do,” a global publishing CEO recently told me during a conference break.  “We’re permanently waiting for someone else to make the first move in case we get it wrong.” Read more »

An industry awash with English graduates | @Tom_Chalmers

I read with interest that the Publishing Association had recruited a Communications Manager, who previously worked at the professional association for Anti-Money Laundering Officers.  Appointments don’t usually catch the attention but in this case it was just the bringing in of new skills from a different industry – an opportunity to bring in relevant but also fresh skills to add into the mix. It brought back to my mind what I have long thought an overlooked but major issue for publishing – the shockingly narrow experience range of those in the sector. Read more »

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