Are UK ebook bestseller prices trending down?

I've started to do some historical analysis of the ebook price data I've been collecting.

In honour of the fact that I'm now going to be blogging for the Bookseller magazine, I decided to look at the UK market first.

(I'm not sure whether I'm going to be able to add the images to the Futurebook blog; check the original at http://luzme.com/blog/2011/06/uk-ebook-bestseller-prices-trending-down/ if necessary) Read more »

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Book apps and the 60/20 problem

I wonder if we can now call the trouble with book apps the 60/20 problem? That is for every £60 of development cost, the return is £20. Read more »

Pay with a tweet is spam

If you are a frequent Twitter user, you must have seen tweets like: ‘I downloaded … for free using Pay with a tweet’ or ‘I paid with a tweet to get … for free’ or something similar. A phenomenon that is gaining popularity, in use, but one that is so wrong that I have no other word for it than to call it spam. Read more »

The innovators

After a weekend to take stock, the first Futurebook Innovation Workshop, run in association with The Literary Platform, seems to boil down to an impression of ideas, enthusiasm, and a crowd of people learning from experience and feeding that back into the next wave of digital products. Read more »

So you’ve got a book app?

In The Netherlands, with a population of 16,5 million people,  there are about one million people who want to write a book. I’m sure there must be millions of them in the UK as well. And although many of them hold the secret desire that their book will be a bestseller, their first goal is the book itself, because even if you hardly sell any copies, you are definitely a writer. Hey, that’s something to talk about when you go to your next school reunion. Read more »

Is the eBook market reaching maturity in the UK?

Something is happening in the world of publishing as it appears the major publishers are finally reacting to the aggressive pricing of eBooks at Amazon by self published authors and independent publishers. This weeks top 20 only 8 titles prepared to take titles over £1. This is great for readers but a worrying sign for smaller publishers and independent authors who have led the way with pricing on eBooks so far. Karin Slaughter’s eBook exclusive ‘The Unremarkable Heart’ is priced at 44p and publishers Cornerstone is clearly going to make a killing. Read more »

Getting behind Pottermore

This week the Harry Potter juggernaut launched a new website Pottermore, promising further revelations next week.

The website itself is delightfully uninformative. But if you click the owl you are taken to a YouTube video with the promise of an "exclusive" announcement coming from the Harry Potter author J K Rowling on 23rd June. Read more »

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FutureBook Innovation Workshop '11 - takeaways

These are the things I remember from #fiw11:

Ken Follet's book, Fall of Giants, has been given a 3D audio soundtrack. This is clever because sound is a sense input into the brain and reading is cognitive, so the brain can do both and not explode. Also, it works.

And... Read more »

Random House unveils e-book series at FutureBook Innovation Workshop

Random House is expanding the Vintage digital Brain Shots imprint, releasing five further titles as the 'Summer of Unrest' series this summer.

Speaking at the inaugural Futurebook Innovation Workshop, held in London Bridge, digital editor Dan Franklin announced that five 10,000 word e-books would be released on 28th July, priced £2.99, with Franklin saying the books, and the imprint, will be aiming to fill the space for long-form journalism left as traditional media contracts. Read more »

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We must become active participants in the shaping of the future

Today we are running FutureBook's Innovation Workshop, in association with my own website The Literary Platform.

It’s been an extraordinary year for book publishers. Every day we seem to witness a new twist or turn of events – many are calling it the Wild West and you can understand why – as these are challenging times for publishers. Read more »

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