An industry rising from the flames | @Tom_Chalmers

I temporarily postponed my non-attendance of award nights this week and arrived at The Bookseller Industry Awards in London (as a guest of the Frankfurt Book Fair – thanks for the invite and hospitality!). And it was interesting to compare the atmosphere to the last BIAs (only three letters away from the BAFTAs) that I went to in 2011. Read more »

Digital awards winners: fit for the future

Faber was last night awarded the Digital Strategy of The Year gong at The Bookseller’s Industry Awards; E-books by Sainsbury’s was named e-bookseller of the year; and NetGalley won the Supply Chain Innovation Award, this final award sponsored by BIC. Read more »

Buggy whipped into collaboration

“Most of you won’t change. Most of you will stick to the tried and true for as long as possible. Most of you will think of digital as a sideline until you become the sideline.” Read more »

Show me the money (first)

When we started our company two years ago, we were often asked why we were called whitefox. I mean, not a pun on books to be seen. The working title for the whole idea had been Maguire, after the 1996 Tom Cruise film Jerry Maguire. Specifically the scene at the beginning where the hard-headed commercial sports agent wakes up from a bad dream with a new business vision: one based on quality, not quantity, based on better, deeper personal relationships. Read more »

Let’s get ready to hack

This week The Bookseller lifts the lid on a project we’ve been working on for six months. The FutureBook Hack is the UK’s first ever industry-wide book hackathon. WME agent Simon Trewin pitched the idea at FutureBook last year, after his own experience at The Publishing Hackathon, run by the Perseus Book Group with WME in the US a year ago. Read more »

A licensing model for fan fiction

Fan fiction is an eternally popular genre by which a reader writes their own stories featuring the characters, plots and settings of their favourite books. In almost all cases, these stories are written and published without the consent of the author. The unhappy outcome is so often that the fan writer is infringing the copyright of their beloved author and the author (or their publisher) face the prospect of resolving the issue by suing their own readers. Read more »

Publishing's messy re-mix

Publishing is a messy business. Many of its practices and some of its thinking pre-date digital. Some of it pre-dates computers. Its digital journey will not be linear, and even if it emerges fully-formed from this electronic swamp, chances are that it will still be a messy business. Read more »

The e-book in front is a book

Last week in The Bookseller we looked at the paperback market, and how the format might change now that e-books take up a large chunk of sales that would otherwise have been captured by the print book. But the corollary to this is how the e-book will change, as the digital format matures. Read more »

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Changing the DNA of the reader

Are readers fixed in how they read? One of the frustrations around the digital transition is that despite all of the under-the-hood changes to publishing, this digital re-wiring has stopped at the reader. Readers, by and large, read now how they did before e-books ever existed. Read more »

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Starting to Accept the Neighbours – @Tom_Chalmers

There was a lack of change in the air at this month’s London Book Fair, but for once this may not have been a bad thing. Settled is not the same as content but 2014 appeared to be the year too-often acrimonious parts found their place alongside each other. Read more »

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