Your weekend white paper: Opening up to Open Access

‘People thought there was no business model’

Open Access (OA) is a wonderful thing in theory: it utilizes technology to make scientific research and results freely available, for the benefit of all. Read more »

Marcello Vena: All Brain's chief future officer

From Big Ideas to a big move

Innovation isn't the holy grail of the moment only for publishing. It can, in fact, mean a leap of faith away from the day-to-day heart of the business for some of our industry's players. Read more »

The ideas have it

When The Bookseller launched the FutureBook Hack earlier this year, I wrote that the “book business has a remarkable record in publishing innovation, and a terrible reputation for digital inertia”. Part of the reason for this is that there are more ideas about this business, and what might be changed about how we go about the business, than there is capacity within it for the ideas to be given the oxygen they need. Read more »

You are your metadata: #FutureChat

"I love algorithms. They get you so much more of the way there than starting with human search." And a lot of folks who agree with Bowker's Laura Dawson were glad she said that during Friday's #FutureChat with The Bookseller's TheFutureBook.net community. Read more »

#FutureChat: Can better data management make good work stand out?

Into the data dome

It was the kind of conference session that sends attendees out into the hallway wide-eyed and wary. And it was hard not to feel for them, too. Read more »

The digital dream: coming soon to an iPad near you

The digital trumpet fanfare sounded for me in 2012

 That's when the Apple software application iBooks Author arrived on the scene. Read more »

Unbound among the fans

Unbound is publishing’s answer to the question: ‘What happens when the computer says no, but the reader might say yes?’

Launched in 2011 by three authors—Crap Towns’ Dan Kieran, QI’s John Mitchinson and historian Justin Pollard—the publisher crowd-funds projects that would otherwise struggle to be published traditionally. Its biggest hit to date is Shaun Usher’s Letters of Note—whose funding target of £50,000 was over-subscribed (283%). The book, co-published with Canongate, has now sold 42,000 copies through Nielsen BookScan’s TCM. Read more »

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